Needles

I was buying a fixed circular needle from Signature Needle Arts at Rhinebeck a few years back.  The nice lady showed me the needles that were set out for trying before you buy.  I stared at them.  I had only been using fixed circs and my Hiya Hiya interchangeables and I didn’t remember what length needle tip they were.  I stared at them all shiny and bright on the table.  They had three different lengths.  Did it really matter?  I knew I wanted the stiletto points, I love sharp weapons, er, needles.  I thought longer would be better so I bought the longest ones.

Fast forward a couple of years.  I had bought the short Addi Lace set and loved it so I had decided to buy the long lace next.  I used both sets without really thinking much about it. I jump between projects* so much I don’t think I’ve ever worked on the same project more than two nights in a row.

Over time though I did begin to notice that the longer needles sort of annoyed me for a couple of reasons.  One being that I felt like I had too many stitches on the needles and they would “jam” up there and two, the way I would hold the needle in my right hand made me realize it was hitting the side of my pinky.

It may have taken me a quite some time to realize my preferences but I’m glad I now know which tools I’m most comfortable working with.  Being more comfortable not just helps me knit better, but it also motivates me to finish a project faster (sort of).

* All these projects were on different needles too.  I know the point of interchangeables is to interchange them but I didn’t like to**, so at the time I had a regular Hiya Hiya set, a sharp Hiya Hiya set (with extra tips), fixed circs, a Clover set (which I later gave away) and both of the Addi Lace sets.

** Even though I use Ravelry extensively for tracking my projects I didn’t like moving needles around.  I have started to lately though and I leave Post-Its noting where I moved the project.  I had to go through three different project bags to track down my US 4s.

2 thoughts on “Needles

Add yours

Leave a Reply to Gail Aronis Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: